The View from the Hills: Deep Winter

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January spells the start of a new phase of life at the farm. To give it a name we’d probably settle on The Deep Winter, although that conjures the idea that the ground is stony cold and there is little sign of life here in the hills.

The Deep Winter also means a big drop off in visitors for us. We start to see people emerging again from camping hibernation around March - although there are a growing number who enjoy this landscape at this time of year.

We are busy working away on mainteance at this time of year, both on the ground and tapping away behind the scenes on computers. The farm never stops and there is always another idea or bubbling plan to turn our attention to.

Diggers, tractors, trailers and chainsaws are a more common sight as various overhanging tasks are ticked off the list. Potholes are strategically filled, the loos painted and fences fixed. This all happens under the brooding skies of the next couple of months, where we can be treated to milky winter sunshine or torrential rain.

The blizzards and snow drifts of 2018 are a distant memory this year as we’ve hardly seen a frost. We get used to these fluctuations through the seasons and across the years. We farmed before we ran the campsite and while we enjoy the patterns we are fully prepared for the weather to take us by surprise.

As with every season I find myself mesmerised by the landscape here in mid Wales. There is a stillness and calmness in January that it is impossible to replicate in any other month. Even with rain lashing at the window panes, there is a sense that this is quiet time, a time for reflection and playing with ideas for the future.

The Deep Winter also means a big drop off in visitors for us. We start to see people emerging again from camping hibernation around March - although there are a growing number who enjoy this landscape at this time of year.

We are busy working away on mainteance at this time of year, both on the ground and tapping away behind the scenes on computers. The farm never stops and there is always another idea or bubbling plan to turn our attention to.

Diggers, tractors, trailers and chainsaws are a more common sight as various overhanging tasks are ticked off the list. Potholes are strategically filled, the loos painted and fences fixed. This all happens under the brooding skies of the next couple of months, where we can be treated to milky winter sunshine or torrential rain.

The blizzards and snow drifts of 2018 are a distant memory this year as we’ve hardly seen a frost. We get used to these fluctuations through the seasons and across the years. We farmed before we ran the campsite and while we enjoy the patterns we are fully prepared for the weather to take us by surprise.

As with every season I find myself mesmerised by the landscape here in mid Wales. There is a stillness and calmness in January that it is impossible to replicate in any other month. Even with rain lashing at the window panes, there is a sense that this is quiet time, a time for reflection and playing with ideas for the future.

Jessie Barstow